Peakbagger.com

Mount Howe, Antarctica

2796 meters, 9173 feet

This is a Provisional Peak entered by a registered Peakbagger.com user.
    Peak submitted by: user 1
This peak, and its information, has not been verified. Editorial staff periodically review all provisional peaks and, as appropriate, move them over to the main peak database.
Latitude/Longitude (WGS84)87° 20' 11'' S, 149° 10' 12'' W
-87.3363, -149.1699 (Dec Deg)
CountryAntarctica
State/Province
Links

Search Engines - search the web for "Mount Howe":
     Wikipedia Search
     Microsoft Bing Search
     Google Search
     Yahoo Search

Ascent Info

No ascents/attempts of this peak logged yet.


Nearby Peak Searches:
     Radius Search - Nearest Peaks to Mount Howe
     Elevation Ladder from Mount Howe
     Prominence Ladder from Mount Howe

Description

Excluding subglacial mountains, and some outlying exposures of rock, Mount Howe is the southermost mountain in the world, located less than 300 kilometres from the South Pole. Its elevation comes from the PGC 1:1,000,000 series, with the value closely aligning with the 2790-metre figure shown by the USGS 1:250,000 map.

The USGS provides the following description:

"An elongated mountain comprising low connecting ridges and gable-shaped nunataks. It rises at the E side of Scott Glacier, near the head, directly opposite Mount McIntyre. This mountain, including its small southern outlier, apparently is the southernmost mountain in the world. Discovered in December 1934 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (ByrdAE) geological party led by Quin Blackburn. Named by Admiral Byrd for Louis McHenry Howe, secretary to the President of the United States at that time, Franklin D. Roosevelt."

Edmund Stump, in his book The Roof At The Bottom Of The World, describes the mountain as such:

"Mount Howe is the land's-end of Earth, interior to Antarctica, the last promontory from which one can gaze south across a frozen ocean, out toward the still turning beyond the arced horizon. It creates the first turbulence in a flux of air begun at the outer edge of the troposphere. Surely, this is the place of spirits - that is, if any inhabit this frozen region at all."

Web Map LinksGeoHack Links   Bing Maps   Google Maps   Open Street Map


Copyright © 1987-2020 by Peakbagger.com. All Rights Reserved. Questions/Comments/Corrections? See the Contact Page Terms of Service