Peakbagger.com

Mount Kosciuszko, Australia


Prominence: 2228 m, 7310 ft

Elevation: 2228 meters, 7310 feet


True Isolation: 1894.26 km, 1177.04 mi
Alternate Name(s)Mount Kosciusko
Latitude/Longitude (WGS84)36° 27' 22'' S; 148° 15' 48'' E
-36.456076, 148.263399 (Dec Deg)
613211E 5964722N Zone 55 (UTM)
CountryAustralia (Highest Point)
State/ProvinceNew South Wales (Highest Point)
Links

Search Engines - search the web for "Mount Kosciuszko":
     Wikipedia Search
     Microsoft Bing Search
     Google Search
     Yahoo Search

Other Web Sites
     Mount Kosciuszko / Tar Gan Gil at SummitPost.org

Lists that contain Mount Kosciuszko:
     Australia 2000-meter Peaks (Rank #1)
     World Country High Points (Rank #118)
     Aetherius Society Holy Mountains (Rank #7)
     The Seven Summits (Unranked)
     World Peaks with 1000 km of Isolation (Rank #34)
     Seven Summits - Continental Landmass High Points (Rank #7)
     Australia/Oceania Country High Points (Rank #6)
     Australia State/Territory High Points (Rank #1)
     Largest-Area Drainage Basin High Points (Rank #25)
     Australia/Oceania Range3 High Points (Rank #13)
     Peaks with Most Page Views on Site (Rank #12)
     Peaks with Most Individual Summiters-Outside USA (Rank #7)
     Most Ascended Peaks-Outside USA (Rank #9)
     1500-meter Prominence Peak with Ascents (Rank #40)

Selected Trip Reports from this site:
     1991 by Gianina Lindsey
     1993-10-17 by Greg Slayden (GPS Track)
     1998-11-27 by Jim Sugden
     2003-04-28 by Charles Everett
     2003-04-29 by Charles Everett
     2007-03-07 by Mick Stanic
     2009-05-12 by Randy Christofferson
     2009-12-18 by Bob Kerr
     2009-12-19 by Paul Michelson
     2010-01-03 by Ken Curtis
     2010-04-21 by Chris Ells
     2010-06-17 by Isaac Heckman
     2011-01-22 by Matthias Ihl
     2013-03-03 by Jobe Wymore
     2013-04-02 by Joseph Knight
     2013-07-17 by Norbert Schaefer
     2014-05-21 by Andrew Rankine (GPS Track)
     2014-09-08 by Bob Tarr
     2014-12-27 by Rob Woodall (GPS Track)
     2015-01-18 by Richard Mclellan (GPS Track)
     2015-03-17 by John E Sarna (GPS Track)

View ascents of peak by registered Peakbagger.com members (121 total)

Nearby Peak Searches:
     Radius Search - Nearest Peaks to Mount Kosciuszko
     Elevation Ladder from Mount Kosciuszko
     Prominence Ladder from Mount Kosciuszko


Description:

Mount Kosciuszko (nicknamed "Kozzy" by the notoriously informal Ozzies) is the highest mountain on the flattest and smallest continent. A thoroughly uninspiring peak, Kosciuszko gets a lot of abuse, particularly from those who claim that the Australia/Oceania continent's rightful contribution to the "Seven Summits" is Puncak Jaya on New Guinea.

Actually, Australia does have some interesting mountainous terrain, including the escarpament areas of the Blue Mountains, the crags of Tasmania, and even Mount Townshend, a craggier peak about 1 km north of Kosciuszko and the second highest of the continent. If any one of these places held Australia's apex, people might not object to the low elevation of the continent high point. Unfortuantely, though, Australia is stuck with Mt. Kosciuszko, a laughably easy dome with a auto-passable road right to the summit.

However, cars are not allowed on the road past the Charlotte's Pass area, so gaining the summit involves a very easy hike of about an hour or so, depending on your fitness. Elevation gain is minimal, and the wide-open terrain is scenic. You can also hike to the summit from the Thredbo ski area to the south, another pretty easy stroll. In the winter, there can be deep snow in the area.

The peak was named in 1840 by Polish-Australian explorer Paul Strzelecki for Tadeusz Kosciuszko (1746-1817), the Polish military hero who fought in both the American and Polish wars of independence. To Strzelecki, the peak resembled the tomb of Kosciuszko in Krakow, Poland. Some think he had climbed Mount Townshend and thought it was the highest.

There is some recent controversy over the spelling of this peak. Until the late 1990s, it was spelled Kosciusko, the long-standing English-language spelling of the Polish patriot's name. However, there has been a movement lately to add the extra "z" to his name to more accurately reflect the Polish spelling, not just in Australia, but in the USA as well (for example, the "Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial" in Philadelphia). Note that a true rendition of the Polish name would have an acute accent over the first "s". And he was born Tadevush Kastsyushka in Belarus, and a true rendition of that name would, I believe, require the Cyrillic alphabet.

An editorial: Even though the governments in Australia are firmly behind the new spelling, to me it seems kind of silly. Like speakers of any other language, English speakers should have the right to make subtle changes to proper names to fit their linguistic and orthographic conventions. In English, the capital of Poland is Warsaw, not Warszawa; the explorer is named Columbus, not Colombo or Colón. I personally don't see much need to add a "z" to Koscuiszko's name, since it will have no effect on the usual English pronounciation.


Mount Kosciusko's gentle, grassy summit dome (1993-10-17).
Web Map LinksBing Maps   Google Maps
Prominence  Clean Prominence: 2228 m/7310 ft
  Optimistic Prominence: 2228 m/7310 ft
  Key Col: Ocean    0 m/0 ft
Isolation1894.26 km/1177.04 mi
Nearest Higher Neighbor in the PBC database:
    Tutoko  (SE)
Isolation Limit Point: 44° 35' 32'' S; 168° 0' 22'' E
    ILP Map Links:
Bing Maps   Google Maps
RangesContinent: Australia-Oceania
Range2: Great Dividing Range (Highest Point)
Range3: South N.S.W. Great Dividing Range (Highest Point)
Drainage BasinsMurray (HP)
Great Australian Bight (HP)
Indian Ocean
OwnershipLand: Kosciusko National Park (Highest Point)
First AscentFebruary, 1840
Paul Strzelecki
Route #1 Closed Road for Hiking
Trailhead: Charlotte Pass 1800 m/5906 ft
Vertical Gain: 428 m/1404 ft
Google Maps Dynamic Map

 Mount Kosciuszko    Other Peaks
Click Here for a Full Screen Map



Other Photos

Click on photo for original larger-size version.
Cindy and I (2010-01-03). Photo by Ken Curtis.
Click here for larger-size photo.



This page has been served 76287 times since 2004-11-01.

Man of Steel opened yesterday, a much-anticipated reboot of the story of Superman¡¯s origins. The title character is played by British actor Henry Cavill, who appeared at the June 12 U.K. premier of the movie in London sporting a Tom Ford suit and an Omega Seamaster wristwatch. It has been reported that in 2005 Cavill was a contender to www.attrinity.com play the new James Bond in Casino Royale, which hit theaters in 2006. Apparently, the producers found him too ¡°young¡± for the role at the time, and it was given to Daniel Craig. This is interesting because both James Bond and Daniel Craig are Omega ambassadors, though both of their model choices generally fall in the sporty Seamaster direction. The version of the elegant Omega Seamaster that Cavill sports includes an annual calendar function. This replica omega Seamaster addition to the automatic movement displays day and date, and will only need to be manually corrected on March 1 due to the differing lengths of February. One very notable thing about the Seamaster¡ªand every other movement now made by Omega¡ªis that it contains the Co-Axial escapement invented by Dr. George Daniels and serialized by Omega over the course of more than ten years to make it perfect for use in a wristwatch movement. The finely finished movement can be seen through the sapphire crystal case back of this officially certified chronometer¡ªwhich means that the movement has undergone a series of grueling tests performed by Switzerland¡¯s Contr?le Official Suisse de Chronom¨¨tres (C.O.S.C. for short), a non-profit organization established in 1973 in Switzerland to certify accuracy. The version that Cahill wears is housed in a 41 mm red gold case that is water-resistant to 100 meters. On a brown leather strap it retails for $23,900 in the United States.


Questions/Comments/Corrections? See the Contact Page
Copyright ?1987-2015 by Peakbagger.com. All Rights Reserved.