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Ascent of Osha Mountain on 2015-08-05

Climber: Phil Robinson

Others in Party:Just me
----Only Party on Mountain
Date:Wednesday, August 5, 2015
Ascent Type:Successful Summit Attained
Peak:Osha Mountain
    Location:USA-New Mexico
    Elevation:10885 ft / 3317 m

Ascent Trip Report

As I was planning to hike Osha Mountain, elevation 10,885 and Peak 10,900/880 I knew that I would have to do lots of backwoods 4 wheel driving, but I did not realize how much! I left the house, 4:15 AM August 6, 2015, then drove north to highway 75 between Taos and Espanola. I took highway 518 north then forest road 438 to the east. DO NOT DO THIS! There is no sign that the road no longer continues and after a very long 4 wheel drive I figured it out first hand. I returned south on highway 518 to Tres Ritos then northeast on forest road 76. The first 20 minutes of this road is passable by a regular car, then after this point it requires a 4 wheel drive vehicle. It was a long slow beautiful scenery road. I turned west for a short way on forest road 153 and by the time I arrived at the point where I was ready to hike I had been traveling from Tres Ritos on dirt roads for 1 hour and 40 minutes, 5 hours and 45 minutes from when I started driving. Wow! I started hiking at 10:00 AM at an elevation 10,450 and headed north. I followed old roads and bushwhacked over quite a number of logs. It was a fairly easy hike. I arrived at the top after hiking 57 minutes over 1.9 miles. The top of the peak is 10,885 feet. On the hike there and back there is a nice meadow to the west with wonderful views in the distance, but there are no views on the top, just trees. I hiked the same way back. The total hike was just under 2 hours and 3.9 mile. The elevation gain both ways was 560 feet.

The drive was so long I wanted to make sure I got every peak in the area. I have only recently been interested in upper 10K peaks and there were 2 in the area. I already did the 11K peaks in the area. I continued driving west on highway 153 for another hour. (Most of the roads are very confusing and the driving is very slow) Before arriving at my parking area I saw about 15 female turkeys. I could have parked very close to the peak, but wanted to get in a good hike, so I parked further down the road, east of the peak. I started hiking on the road at 1:00 PM. Most of the hike was on the road but the last bit was bushwhacking through the woods and over some logs. All of the hiking today was spectacularly beautiful, lush, green and full of wildflowers everywhere. I hiked Mount Whitney in California 2 weeks ago and the New Mexico lushness is far beyond the 64 miles I hiked in California. Hiking there really gave me an appreciation for northern New Mexico summer lushness! It took 1 hour and 5 minutes to hike Peak 10,900/880. The total distance was 2.3 miles. There are some slight views on the top, through trees that were burned out in a forest fire years ago. I returned the same way. The total hike was 4.6 miles and it took about 2 hours round trip. The total elevation gain both ways was about 700 feet. I started heading to the east on forest road 441. I drove a long ways and fortunately ran into some forest service people, the only people I had seen today, and they said the road did not go through. Four maps said that 441 and 438 went through! NEITHER OF THESE ROADS GO THROUGH! I asked them for the best way out to a major road and the had me go east to forest road 153 then north to 164 then north to 437 and out on paved road highway 64 east of Taos. I spent about another hour driving and finally made it to a main road. There is the road to Taos, the high road to Taos (Camino Royal) and I had just taken the ultra high road to Taos. It was a long but spectacularly beautiful drive. I headed back to the Albuquerque area and arrived home at 7:45 PM. I spent 11 hours driving in the SUV! This is about the same time it took me to get to Lone Pine, California from Albuquerque 2 weeks ago when I hiked Mount Whitney! I contacted the forest service the next day and told them they needed to put up some “Dead End” or “No Outlet” signs, 2 going east and 2 going west on forest roads 438 and 441. If they had done this for me, it would have saved hours of driving. Fortunately I topped off my gas before driving into the back country. The total hiking distance for the day was 8.5 miles with a total elevation gain for both peaks of 1,260. I was really worn out when I got home. I think most of it had to do with driving 11 hours to do the 2 peaks.
*Note see Peak 10,900/880 for other GPS track

I decided to make these 2 peaks the last 2 peaks of the year because I want to “hold some peaks in reserve.” I hiked 118 miles peakbagging this year, which was a little more than any other year. I climbed 16 peaks, 13 of which were new and hiked my “Mt. Everest,” yearly elevation gain greater than sea level to Everest. My yearly elevation gain was 30,625 the second greatest of any year. I am interested in hiking the major 102 peaks in New Mexico with all the minors in-between. That is a total of 164 peaks of which I have 131. I am also interested in hiking some western high points. To celebrate turning 60 years old, I hiked Mount Whitney in California and Keeler Needle, hiking 64 miles in 6 days with my son. See that trip report.
Phil Robinson
Summary Total Data
    Elevation Gain:560 ft / 169 m
    Distance:3.9 mi / 6.3 km
    Route Conditions:
Road Hike, Bushwhack
Ascent Statistics
    Elevation Gain:510 ft / 154 m
    Extra Loss:75 ft / 22 m
    Distance:1.9 mi / 3.1 km
    Route:Hiked north from forest road 153
    Trailhead:10450 ft / 3185 m
    Time Up:57 Minutes
Descent Statistics
    Extra Gain:50 ft / 15 m
    Distance:2 mi / 3.2 km
    Route:Hiked back south to forest road 153
    Time Down:56 Minutes
Ascent Part of Trip: Osha Mt & Peak 10900/880

Complete Trip Sequence:
OrderPeak/PointDate
1Osha Mountain2015-08-05 a
2Peak 108802015-08-05 b
GPS Data for Ascent/Trip


 GPS Waypoints - Hover or click to see name and lat/long
Peaks:  climbed and  unclimbed by Phil Robinson
Click Here for a Full Screen Map
Note: GPS Tracks may not be accurate, and may not show the best route. Do not follow this route blindly. Conditions change frequently. Use of a GPS unit in the outdoors, even with a pre-loaded track, is no substitute for experience and good judgment. Peakbagger.com accepts NO responsibility or liability from use of this data.

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