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High Points of Named Parallels/Meridians - Multiple Ascents Grid

RankPeak Elev-M  Prom-M TotalRound 1
(0)
1.Tropic of Capricorn High Point51600  
2.Cayambe-Equator High Point46800  
3.Tropic of Cancer High Point36400  
4.Date Line High Point31000  
5.Prime Meridian High Point30600  
6.Arctic Circle High Point24900  
7.Antarctic Circle High Point21200  

Main Peak List: Click here to see the standard peak listing, showning more informational columns and just the first ascent date.

Front Runners List: Click here to see list completion progress by climbers that log their climbs using Peakbagger.com.

Compare Climbers: Click here to compare ascents of up to 5 climbers working on this list.

About the Multiple Ascent Grid:

  • This table grid shows all peaks on a given list, and all ascents done by Chris Turgeon, up to 10 ascents per peak.
  • While many peakbaggers do not like to repeat ascents, some will try to do multiple "laps" or "rounds" of a favorite list, often one close to home.
  • The header for each ascent column shows, in parentheses, the total number of peaks climbed in each "round", and clicking the header link will sort your ascents for that round.
  • Due to space limitations, this listing has just the basic peak info, so up to ten date columns can be shown. Please use the main peak list (linked above) for more basic info and functionality.
  • Some climbers will log two ascents of the same peak on the same day--for example, when doing an out-and-back ridge run with other ascents sandwiched between two of the same peak. Some might not consider these to be two separate ascents for the purposes of doing multiple rounds. Clicking on the "Count a peak only once per day" link in the header will collapse multiple ascents of a peak on a single day into just one ascent for this grid list.

List Description

This list is not to be taken very seriously--the "peaks" on it are all slope points (or "liners"), many of them are on very remote polar icecaps, and, due to astronomical phenomena, some of their positions are constantly shifting. But it does give an indication of the approximate locations where the most iconic and well-known parallels and meridians reach their highest point.

For the high points of the Equator, Prime Meridian, and "Date Line" 180-degree meridian, the WGS84 datum is used. The two tropic and the two polar circles shift by about 15 meters every year so any point given here is just an approximation.

Three of these points are on the vast, desolate icecaps of Antarctica or Greenland. The other four points are relatively accessible to intrepid peakbaggers with nothing else better to do, since they lie near well known peaks:

 


Map Showing Location of Peaks

 = Peaks climbed by Chris Turgeon   = Unclimbed peaks

Click on a peak to see its name and a clickable link.

(Map only shows peaks ranked by clean prominence)

Click Here for a Full Screen Map


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